OSU Navigation Bar

The Ohio State University

School of Environment and Natural Resources

Welcome to the School of Environment and Natural Resources
Come to the Gwynne Conservation Area
Environmental Professionals Network
Visit us
Plan your trip today - offering over 25 landowner programs offered on wildlife, aquatics and woodlands!
Be inspired. Grow professionally. Ohio is home to thousands of environmental professionals working every day to make the world a better place. Join our community today!
Pictures may be worth a thousand words, but a visit is worth so much more! Spending time with us is a great way to see up close what we do here both in and out of the classroom.

School of Environment and Natural Resources

About Us

The many faces of the School of Environment and Natural Resources invite you to discover our extension and outreach programs, our multiple research locations, the academic programs our students are engaged in, and the research being conducted by our faculty. Let this site be your guide in your discovery through this amazing school- it is our passion to help you find your fit at The Ohio State University's School of Environment and Natural Resources and make your SENR experience exceptional.

Latest Headlines

Another Ohio invasive species isn’t a tiny matter. In fact it can weigh up to 200 pounds. Feral swine -- also called feral pigs and feral hogs -- have planted their hooves in the state, mainly in the southeastern corner, said Marne Titchenell, wildlife specialist in Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.
Distinguished University Professor of soil science in the School of Environment and Natural Resources Dr. Rattan Lal is influencing the future direction of his field, and of the world.

The August (8/12) Environmental Professionals Network breakfast will feature a panel of OSU, state and federal experts discussing the status of Ohio’s woodlands both environmentally and economically, and the numerous threats they face: “Pests and Invasives, Fragmentation, Changing Markets – Do Ohio’s Forests Need Foresters or Magicians?”