About Us: News

  1. Soil microbiologist  Nicola Lorenz is part of a native conservation project on Ohio strip-mine land and is sampling the mined soils to investigate its qualities. Photo Credit:  Rebecca Swab, Ph.D Director of Restoration Ecology The Wilds

    Strip-mine land restoration efforts on front page of The Columbus Dispatch

    Sep 26, 2017

    A collaborative project on the restoration of Ohio strip-mine land is the focus of a front-page feature article in The Columbus Dispatch. School of Environment and Natural Resources soil microbiologists Richard Dick and Nicola Lorenz are part of a team that is studying native conservation of abandoned strip mine lands and are surveying mined soil at three sites to study microscopic organisms that help plants thrive.

  2. ENR 5279 students soil sampling and taking in-field soil measurements. The course taught by Drs. Nick Basta and Brian Slater is featured in a recent article in The Lantern. Photo credit: Nall Moonilall

    Urban Soils Course Featured

    Sep 25, 2017

    Urban Soils and Ecosystem Services: Assessment and Restoration, a course offered through the School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR) and taught by faculty members Nick Basta and Brian Slater is featured in The Lantern article, “Ohio State course gets students involved in urban development.”  

  3. A midwest cornfield

    As nations tilt toward deglobalization, Ohio State will study how food, energy and water systems in the Great Lakes region might be affected

    Sep 20, 2017

    SENR faculty members Doug Jackson-Smith and Robyn Wilson are part of a highly collaborative team of Ohio State researchers who will study how food, energy and water systems in the Great Lakes region might be affected as nations tilt toward deglobalization. 

  4. Sssselebrities to follow on Twitter

    Sep 20, 2017

    Follow radiotagged endangered Timber Rattlesnakes on this Twitter feed, run by SENR's Peterman Lab, to keep on what these snakes in south east Ohio are up to!

    Article originally published in CFAES' On Sustainability, written by Kurt Knebusch

  5. Ohio State course gets students involved in urban development

    Sep 20, 2017

    Course offered by Dr. Nick Basta and Dr. Brian Slater involves students in urban development projects; evaluating soils and determining possible modifications to improve soil quality is the focus of the class.

    Article published in The Lantern, written by Zach Grader (grader.2)

  6. An Ohio State University researcher is part of a new $750,000 project to determine whether conservation incentives provided by the federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative(GLRI) are meeting one of their goals: to get more farmers to adopt measures that preserve water quality.  Robyn Wilson, associate professor of risk analysis and decision science in Ohio State’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will co-lead the pro

    CFAES Researcher Part of New Project Studying Conservation Incentives, Farming Practices

    Sep 18, 2017

    An Ohio State University researcher is part of a new $750,000 project to determine whether conservation incentives provided by the federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative(GLRI) are meeting one of their goals: to get more farmers to adopt measures that preserve water quality.

    Robyn Wilson, associate professor of risk analysis and decision science in Ohio State’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, part of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), will co-lead the project’s social component along with Stephen Gasteyer of Michigan State University.

    The overall leader of the two-year project, called Researching Effectiveness of Agricultural Programs, or REAP, is the binational Great Lakes Commission (GLC) based in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

  7. US Environmental Protection Agency recently opened registration for the 2017 iteration of its Campus RainWorks Challenge. The challenge is a design competition in which student teams, along with faculty advisors, are tasked with improving stormwater management on their campuses in a way that reduces environmental impacts while improving campus aesthetics and usability. (Photo: Chesapeake Bay Program)

    Student Opportunity: US EPA Announces 2017 Campus RainWorks Challenge

    Sep 18, 2017

    The US Environmental Protection Agency recently opened registration for the 2017 iteration of its Campus RainWorks Challenge. The challenge is a design competition in which student teams, along with faculty advisors, are tasked with improving stormwater management on their campuses in a way that reduces environmental impacts while improving campus aesthetics and usability. Past projects have recommended installing permeable pavement, rainwater harvesting, building rain gardens, and more.

  8. Canoe tour led by SENR student featured in Outdoor News

    Sep 15, 2017

    Canoe tour led by summer TWEL intern Andrew Wilk of Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve in Huron, Ohio is the focus of recent article in Outdoor News. 

     

  9. SENR Professor and C-MASC Director Rattan Lal awarded Borlaug Fellowship.

    Professor Lal Awarded Borlaug Fellowship

    Sep 12, 2017

    Rattan Lal, Professor and Director, Carbon Management and Sequestration Center, School of Envrionment and Natural Resources is one of three CFAES faculty members, who have have been awarded international research fellowships through USDA's Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. By working with a distinguished visiting international scholar from a developing or middle-income country, these CFAES faculty will broaden their own network of international collaborators as well as focus on long-term research endeavors that promote improved food security and economic growth.

  10. A prairie flower blooms in the Gwynne Conservation Area during the 2016 Farm Science Review. (Photo: CFAES.)

    Gwynne a Green Spot at Farm Science Review: Why You Should Check It Out

    Sep 11, 2017

    A short wagon ride away from Farm Science Review’s rows of gleaming tractors, its grounds full of hundreds of exhibitors, its streets packed by thousands of visitors, you’ll see another side of agriculture.  Its waters, woods and wildlife.  Welcome to the Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area, where Deer Creek flows in the shade of a forest. Bluegill fish dimple the surface of ponds. Killdeer birds call from a wetland mudflat. The wind rustles big bluestem prairie grass. And many of the Review’s expected 100,000-plus visitors will find ideas on caring for their land.

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