About Us: News

  1. Professor Emeritus Joe Donnemeyer is one of three keynote speakers at the first-ever International Rural Crime Conference.

    Professor Emeritus Keynote at International Rural Crime Conference

    Aug 31, 2017

    Ohio State Professor Emeritus Joe Donnemeyer is one of three keynote speakers at the first-ever International Rural Crime Conference in South Africa Sept. 27.

  2. A program called “Agriculture and Water Quality Issues: OSU Research and Agency Initiatives Guide Farmers’ Solutions,” hosted by the Ohio State-based Environmental Professionals Network, is Sept. 12 in Columbus. (Photo: iStock.)

    Event to Look at Farming, Water Quality, Ohio’s Efforts for Both

    Aug 28, 2017

    Agriculture and water quality flow together. So do Ohio’s efforts to improve them.  The next Environmental Professionals Network (EPN) breakfast program will look at those ties and at new progress in serving the state’s farmers, food and water.  The event, which is open to the public, is Sept. 12 at The Ohio State University.

  3. Richard Moore, emeritus professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and adjunct emeritus professor in the Department of Anthropology, will receive the Public Policy Award from the American Anthropological Association in November.

    Emeritus Professor to Receive Public Policy Award

    Aug 24, 2017

    Congratulations to Richard Moore, emeritus professor in the School of Environment and Natural Resources and adjunct emeritus professor in the Department of Anthropology, who will receive the Public Policy Award from the American Anthropological Association in November.

  4. Registration is open for the 2017 Ohio Environmental Leaders Institute

    Registration for the 2017 Ohio Environmental Leaders Institute is Now Open!

    Aug 24, 2017

    Registration for the 2017 Ohio Environmental Leaders Institute is Now Open! Developing Leadership in Ohio’s Urban Environmental Landscape  The Ohio Environmental Leaders Institute provides environmental, natural resources and sustainability professionals (and professionals-in-training) with the skills needed to better address the many complex, unique environmental issues facing our state.  This annual, cohort-based program seeks participants from the private, public, non-profit sectors. Individuals who lead, or who aspire to lead collaborative planning and decision-making processes that integrate science and public values will benefit the most from participating in OELI.
  5. New plantings in Farm Science Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area will benefit pollinators like this monarch butterfly. (Photo: iStock.)

    See New Streambank, Prairie Projects in Farm Science Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area

    Aug 21, 2017

    Look for new features like wildflowers and a healthy streambank in Farm Science Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area.  The nearly 70-acre facility, part of the Review’s host site, the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio, has two new projects underway — one to diversify its prairie plantings; the other, to protect the banks of Deer Creek, which flows through the grounds.  Review Manager Nick Zachrich said the projects offer two benefits: They improve the Gwynne itself year round. And they demonstrate practices that farmers — especially the Review’s expected 100,000-plus visitors Sept. 19-21 — can take home and use on their own land, too.

  6. ENR Express Services Every Friday SP18

    Aug 14, 2017

    ENR Express Services for Spring 2018.

  7. The Composting in Ohio industry tour is for anyone interested in commercial or large-scale composting. Tour stops will be in Huron and Cleveland. (Photo: iStock.)

    Ohio Composting Industry Tour Is Aug. 24

    Aug 7, 2017

    This year’s Composting in Ohio tour, featuring industry issues and innovative facilities, will center around Lake Erie.  The Aug. 24 event is for anyone interested in commercial or large-scale composting, including business owners, compost facility staff, farmers, scientists and public officials.  Participants on the tour will visit Barnes Nursery Inc.’scompost facility in Huron, which annually turns 20,000 tons of yard waste, food scraps and other materials into plant-friendly soils and composts; and a new system run by the Port of Cleveland and Cleveland’s Kurtz Bros. Inc. that recycles sediment dredged from the lake and the Cuyahoga River.  Huron is about 50 miles west of Cleveland along Lake Erie’s shore.

  8. Diagnose Problems in Your Trees, Including New Beech Disease You are here Home » News » News Releases July 27, 2017 0   Ohio State’s Tree Diagnostic Workshop is Aug. 4 in Mansfield. (Photo: American beech, iStock.)

    Learn to Diagnose Problems in Your Trees, Including New Beech Disease

    Aug 1, 2017

    A mystery illness is hitting northeast Ohio’s American beech trees.  Called beech leaf disease, it’s causing striped and curled leaves, weak buds, and sometimes the death of saplings.  It seems to be spreading fast, too.  “And we really don’t know what’s causing it,” said Kathy Smith, forestry program coordinator at The Ohio State University.  The less-bad news: An upcoming event will shed light on the disease, plus many other problems that can bug Ohio’s trees.

  9. The 2017 Energy Impacts Symposium will look at how new energy development affects people, communities and economies. (Photo: Solar farm, Wyandot County, Ohio, Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

    First Energy Impacts Symposium Starts Wednesday at Ohio State

    Jul 25, 2017

    The first-ever Energy Impacts Symposium is taking place this Wednesday and Thursday at The Ohio State University.  The event is an international research conference on the effects of new energy development — including both renewable and fossil fuels — on people, communities and economies.  Organizers are expecting about 140 energy-related social science experts from 25 U.S. states, Canada, five continents and 100 universities. The experts will represent fields such as public health, public policy, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science and community development.

  10. Ohio State’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program is co-sponsoring a chainsaw safety class on Aug. 3 in Mansfield. (Photo: iStock.)

    How to Be Safe When You’re Using a Chainsaw

    Jul 24, 2017

    When it comes to using a chainsaw, there are things you want to cut, like any of Ohio’s millions of still-standing dead ash trees killed by the emerald ash borer pest, and things you don’t want to cut, like … anything not a tree.  A class offered Aug. 3 in Mansfield will help you keep them straight.  Chainsaw Safety: CSAW Level 1 offers 8 hours of training by experts from the Zanesville-based Ohio Forestry Association. Topics will include personal protective equipment, chainsaw safety features, chainsaw maintenance, and the reaction forces acting on a chainsaw’s chain and guide bar.

Pages