Congress draws Arachnologists from all over the world

Oct. 6, 2016
SENR doctoral student Sarah Rose on the Mid-Congress Elevation Excursion to Loveland Pass at the 20th International Congress of Arachnology, Golden, CO.

School of Environment and Natural Resources doctoral student, Sarah  Rose presented, “Understanding how changes in the ground spider community can enhance restoration practices” at the joint meeting of the International Society of Arachnology (ISA) and the 40th annual meeting of the American Arachnological Society at the 20th International Congress of Arachnology held in Golden, Colorado.  

The Congress is held every 3 years and draws arachnologists from all over the world.

Rose presented findings from a study she and co-author, School of Environment and Natural Resources Professor Charles Goebel conducted on the ground hunting spider community in former wildfire sites that are the focus of conservation and restoration efforts in northern Lower Michigan. These forests are breeding grounds for the endangered Kirtland’s Warbler (KW). 

 

  
A wolf spider (Lycosidae).                                                   A Kirtland's Warbler
                             

“I love the arachnological meetings as everyone is very friendly and open to sharing. This meeting, being the international congress, I met people from all over the world, and got to talk with some of the big names in arachnology,” Rose said.  

Rose is specializing in Ecological Restoration in the Environment and Natural Resources Graduate Program.


Participants at the Joint meeting of the 20th International Congress of Arachnology and the 40th annual meeting of the American Arachnological Society. (Photo credit: American Arachnological Society)