Graduate Research

  1. Maggie Beetstra, a doctoral student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources awarded a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation grant.

    Graduate student awarded a NSF Dissertation grant to study conservation decision-making

    Mar 2, 2020

    Congratulations to Maggie Beetstra, a doctoral student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR), who was awarded a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation grant, “Evaluating the Effects of Financial and Temporal Scarcity on Farmer Decisions to Engage in Conservation” through the  Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program.

  2. TWEL Presentations at The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society Joint Conference

    Sep 30, 2019

    Terrestrial Wildlife and Ecology Lab (TWEL) faculty and graduate students are presenting their research at this year's joint conference of The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society, September 29 to October 3, 2019, Reno, NV

  3. Kowlett Spring 2019 Seminar Series Starts Feb. 7

    Feb 6, 2019

  4. Funding awarded to study trust in food, energy, and water consumption feedback

    Dec 11, 2017

    Congratulations to Ian Adams, a first year M.S. student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR) with a specialization in Environmental Social Sciences, who was awarded funding through the Decision Sciences Collaborative small grants program at The Ohio State University.

  5. School of Environment and Natural Resources doctoral student Marisol Becerra and faculty member Dr. Kerry Ard are co-authors on new article in Diabetes Care.

    Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Diabetes Disparities examined in new article

    Dec 6, 2017

    Findings from a study co-authored by School of Environment and Natural Resources doctoral student Marisol Becerra and faculty member Dr. Kerry Ard are featured in the November 29th edition of Physicians Briefing. The article, “Disparities in Environmental Exposures to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Diabetes Risk in Vulnerable Populations” in the journal Diabetes Care reviews the evidence linking unequal exposures to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals with racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diabetes disparities in the U.S. and social forces promoting these disparities; and explores potential interventions.

  6. Tania Burgos-Hernández, a doctoral student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources is studying Ohio State soils to determine their ability to store carbon.

    Doctoral student's research on Ohio State soils featured

    Feb 21, 2017

    Tania Burgos-Hernández, a doctoral student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources is featured on the website of the Office of Energy and Environment for her research on urban soils. In particular, she is analyzing urban soils on the Ohio State campus to determine their ability to store carbon. To study Ohio State soils, she is collecting multiple samples from 150 soil cores and three pits dug on campus. Soil cores will be collected later this year. Burgos-Hernández will thoroughly analyze the physical properties of the cores she collects. She will examine the color, texture and structure, as well as chemical and biological properties of the soil to determine carbon, metals and other factors.
  7. Do backyard feeders help — or possibly hurt — birds like this northern cardinal? A new study of nesting success says the answer is complicated. (Photo: iStock.)

    Feeding Your Feathered Friends? Study Finds Complex Relationships Among Bird Feeders, Predators and Nest Survival

    Feb 7, 2017

    Backyard bird lovers may want to take note: Putting out feeders full of seed may also attract predators that eat eggs and nestlings. But the feeders may also help satiate predators so they’re less likely to target nests.  In a new study published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, scientists from The Ohio State University and Cornell University investigated the consequences of supplemental bird food on predator-prey relationships.

  8. Thomas Delomas and Christopher Codogni collecting eggs from ovulating zebrafish.

    New method to screen zebrafish for unique genetic mutations detailed

    Dec 7, 2016

    Delomas and Dabrowski (2016) detail a new method for performing haploid gynogenetic screens in zebrafish in a recently published article in the scientific journal, Biology Letters. The described method uses UV-irradiated common carp (koi) sperm to induce zebrafish embryonic development. This method will allow the biomedical industry and other research laboratories to rapidly screen zebrafish for unique genetic mutations. Finding new mutations helps us learn about human disease and developmental biology.  
  9. David Hix presented a poster highlighting the Joint Fire Science Program’s Fire Science National Knowledge Exchange Network.  Faculty and staff from SENR, including David Hix, Eric Toman, Jack McGowan-Stinski, and Charles Goebel help lead the Lake States Fire Science Consortium (LSFSC), a group of over 525 fire managers, practitioners, and scientists.  The objective of the LSFSC is to help communicate the best available fire science and do so through a variety of methods including webinars, research briefs,

    Forestry research presented at national convention

    Nov 15, 2016

    School of Environment and Natural Resources faculty and graduate students attended and presented posters on their forestry research at the 2016 Society of American Foresters (SAF) National Convention held in Madison, WI.

  10. SENR Graduate Student Alicia Brunner presenting at the 2016 Ohio Avian Research Conference (Photo credit: Casey Tucker)

    Avian Research Recognized at State Conference

    Oct 28, 2016

    School of Environment and Natural Resources graduate students Alicia Brunner and Kristie Stein were recognized with the Dr. David R. Osborne Research Award for their presentations at the 2016 Ohio Avian Research Conference held October 22, 2016 at Denison University in Granville, Ohio. The award recognizes excellence in graduate research focusing on furthering our understanding, or the conservation, of migratory birds.

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