Richard Dick

  1. Professor Richard Dick (far right) in Senegal, where his team is partnering with farmers to conduct research on rhizosphere hydrology and microbiology of shrub-intercropping systems (Photo credit: Dam Sy)

    Professor invited lecturer at Gordon Research Conference

    Aug 1, 2016

    School of Environment and Natural Resources Professor and Ohio Eminent Scholar Richard Dick attended a Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Multi-scale Vascular Plant Biology (MVPB) held at the end of June 2016 in rural Maine. 

  2. Professor Richard Dick with farmers in Niger beside Guiera senegalensis, an indigenous shrub his research has shown enhances soils, reduces drought stress, and increases crop productivity in the Sahel. (Photo credit: Dr. Tougiani ABASSE)

    Professor participates in global gathering

    Mar 22, 2016

    Professor Richard Dick, was an invited participant at the first Next Einstein Forum (NEF) Global Gathering, held March 8-10, 2016 in Dakar, Senegal.  For the past 15 years, Dick, funded mainly by the National Science Foundation, has led a team of scientists conducting research on rhizosphere hydrology and microbiology of shrub-intercropping systems in Senegal, West Africa.  He was asked to attend the invitation-only forum in recognition of his long-term research of semi-arid agroecosystems and engagement with West African scientists and universities, Dick said.

  3. MicroTrop 2014: Combining Soil Microbiology with African Culture, Agriculture and Development Issues

    Sep 10, 2014

  4. CFAES Students Gain International Research Experience, and Much More

    Jan 21, 2014

    College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences graduate and undergraduate students since summer of 2013 are part of a research project in Senegal; sponsored by the National Science Foundation Division of Biology within the Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project. Richard Dick, professor of Soil Microbial Ecology in the School of Environment and Natural Resources directs the $2.6 million NSF PIRE project that is focusing on the Sahel where landscape degradation is causing desertification and seriously reducing food security.  A potential solution is two unrecognized native shrub species that can be intercropped to provide benefits to soils and crops while restoring Sahelian agroecosystems. 

  5. SENR Professor Directs Collaborative Project Focused on Restoring Fragile Landscapes on the Sahel

    Jun 13, 2013

    Richard Dick, professor of Soil Microbial Ecology directs a $2.6 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project focusing on the Sahel where landscape degradation is causing desertification that seriously reduces food security.  A potential key for restoring these landscapes are two unrecognized shrub species that can coexist with crops and have the ability to lift water from wet sub- to dry-surface soil and improve soils.